How To Make Clap Switch Diagram

How To Make Clap Switch

Making a clap switch diagram is far from the most thrilling task you’ll ever have to do. However, it’s essential in understanding how to install and wire a burglar alarm – something that’s not rocket science, but you will need to spend a few minutes following the steps in this blog post first.

A clap switch is an interesting hobby circuit that turns on/off the load by simply clapping your hands. With this clap switch, you can control any electrical device just by a simple clap. The working of this circuit is very simple and easy to understand. This circuit is built around two op-amps (IC1 and IC2) from the dual op-amp LM358. The first stage of the circuit is a microphone (MIC) section which detects loud sound produced by handclaps and produces a voltage across its terminals. The amplified output from the first stage op-amp IC2 is applied to the non-inverting terminal (pin 6) of the second op-amp IC3 through a 10kΩ resistor R3

A clap switch is an interesting hobby circuit that turns on/off the load by simply clapping your hands

A clap switch is an interesting hobby circuit that turns on/off the load by simply clapping your hands. It is a simple circuit, but at the same time, fun and cool.

The clap switch works by using single-pole double-throw (SPDT) NAND gate ICs to detect the “clap” sound produced by two people clapping their hands together in a small space such as a room or hall. When no noise is detected, it switches state; otherwise, it remains in its original state. The output of this detection system drives a MOSFET transistor that controls current flow through an LED and hence turns ON/OFF its light emission when needed.

With this clap switch, you can control any electrical device just by a simple clap

With this clap switch, you can control any electrical device just by a simple clap. It is a very interesting hobby circuit that turns on/off the load by simply clapping your hands. This requires no programming and is easy to build. You can easily make this with components available at home or in your junk box.

Here are some useful ideas:

  • Control lights around you as you walk into a room (or out of it)
  • Turn off lights when someone enters or leaves a room where you want darkness (like a sleeping room)
  • Turn off lights when someone enters or leaves a dark area so that he does not trip over himself in darkness

The working of this circuit is very simple and easy to understand

This circuit is very simple and easy to understand. The microphone converts sound into an electrical signal. This amplified signal is fed to the op-amp where it’s compared with a reference voltage, which is produced by the Zener diode. If the input voltage exceeds this reference level, the output of OPAMP goes high and hence switches on Q1, thus activating LED1.

The first stage of the circuit is a microphone (MIC) section which detects loud sound produced by handclaps and produces a voltage across its terminals

The first stage of the circuit is a microphone (MIC) section which detects loud sound produced by handclaps and produces a voltage across its terminals.

The MIC section is connected to the second stage of the circuit which consists of two operational amplifiers (OP AMPS). The second stage amplifies the signals from the MIC section so that they can be used as an input to gates G1 and G2.

Both stages are connected in series with their respective source voltages VCC respectively.

The amplified output from the first stage op-amp IC2 is applied to the non-inverting terminal (pin 6) of the second op-amp IC3 through a 10kΩ resistor R3

The amplified output from the first stage op-amp IC2 is applied to the non-inverting terminal (pin 6) of the second op-amp IC3 through a 10kΩ resistor R3. The non-inverting terminal of IC3 is connected to the base of transistor Q1, which acts as a switch controlled by a clock pulse derived from a 555 timer IC4.

Transistor Q1 has its collector connected to pin 3 of IC4 and its emitter configured for current flow with respect to ground through varistor VR1 and coil L2, which are used as an overvoltage protection circuit against voltage spikes caused by electrostatic discharge or lightning strikes.

Take a look at these guides too while working with your electronic components

These guides are helpful for understanding how to check if a particular electronic component is working.

  • How to check if a battery is working: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Check-If-A-Battery-Is-Working/
  • How to check if a motor is working: https://www.instructables.com/id/How_to_check_if_a_motor_is_working//
  • How to check if a bulb is working: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Check-If-A-LEDs-Lighting//
  • How to check if a switch is working: https://www.instructables.com/id/Hacking A Lamp For $5 Or Less /!\ WARNING DO NOT BUY CHEAP LAMPS OR SWITCHES IN CASE OF ELECTRICAL SHOCK TO YOURSELF OR OTHERS///DO IT AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!

Conclusion

We hope this post has given you a good idea of what materials you need to create your own clap switch. It can be tricky at first, so don’t worry if it takes some time and practice to get the hang of it! You will find that once you have your setup nailed down things will start running smoothly. Keep working on perfecting your circuit and most importantly, have fun with electronics!

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